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Author Topic: Q: How can I get Lightwave 8 to export a level to play in OA  (Read 9390 times)
theskeletonking
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« on: November 20, 2007, 11:19:52 PM »

The subject says it all. I have lightwave alien and some great ideas for levels. I am running a macbook with mac os x 10.5, and windows vista (this is the OS with lightwave, but if any 3rd party apps require a mac, I'm covered). Is there a way for me to develop a level for OA with Lightwave?
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kit89
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2007, 01:18:52 AM »

If lightwave can export to either the .map(native map format for building maps with OA) or the .ase format then you should be able to create maps.

However you will need GtkRadiant; This program allows you to put to together maps and then compile them with q3map2 into the final .BSP format.

If you've never done mapping before I'd recommend trying to learn GtkRadiant before delving into anything else more complex.
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2007, 09:36:58 AM »

but ase has its drawbacks for map geometry, namely no vis blocking.
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theskeletonking
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2007, 02:00:34 PM »

but ase has its drawbacks for map geometry, namely no vis blocking.

what is "vis blocking," and what is "ase?"
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kit89
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2007, 02:24:47 PM »

Quote
what is "vis blocking,"

"Vis"ing is used by the games compiler to determine what can be seen by the player at any given point. The q3map2 is a compiler that compiles the .map format into a .bsp with the "vis" worked out. So that the game engine can use it.

A .map is a simple text file that has co-ordinates of brushes(or blocks) with textures on it.

Quote
and what is "ase?"

A .ase is a model format like .lwo. The .ase format is very useful for complex shapes over large distances. However models are not included in the vis-ing process. It's a bit complex to explain, but in short if you have a large model that blocks the player from seeing the rest of the map the vis looks at it and says "nope player can see the whole map" time to render it all.

There are ways around that by using brushes.

There are some very good tutorials that can explain far better than I can and tell the advantages and disadvantages of using .ase or brushes. The best way is to use a mixture of both. Smiley
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theskeletonking
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2007, 09:57:17 PM »

Are there any size, or texture rules?
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kit89
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« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2007, 12:47:15 AM »

Size comes down to practise. You want your map big enough to support a large amount of players but at the same time not too big that it takes ages to move from one side to the other.

Textures: Basic rules apply: Seamless textures are best, try and reduce tiling on large areas. Texture sizes are usually 512x512 or 256x256. 
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w1zrd
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« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2007, 01:02:56 AM »

Are there any size, or texture rules?
As kit89 said below:
Quote
Texture sizes are usually 512x512 or 256x256.
Adding to that, any sizes will cut it for you but staying with the power of two is your best bet.
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theskeletonking
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2007, 06:53:25 PM »

Textures: Basic rules apply: Seamless textures are best, try and reduce tiling on large areas. Texture sizes are usually 512x512 or 256x256. 

I have a fairly large area that need a grass texture, and also a slightly smaller large area than needs dirt. What texture size do you recommend? And I'm talking an area not too much smaller than your average level.



____________________________________________________________________




Adding to that, any sizes will cut it for you but staying with the power of two is your best bet.

What exactly do you mean by "cut it"?
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kit89
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« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2007, 02:21:24 AM »

Quote
What exactly do you mean by "cut it"?

He means what suits/what you prefer.

I'd recommend a texture size of 512x512 for both grass & dirt. You'd probably also want to blend the textures together to make them look seamless when you cross over from one to another.

How you do that in lightwave & get it to show in OpenArena I do not know. I'd suggesting google-ing it.

Your main priority tho would be trying to reduce the tiling effect of your large area this can be done by adding in trees blending other textures into the grass(to make paths etc) and adding in some long grass.
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theskeletonking
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« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2007, 09:03:11 PM »

what about lighting. Colored lighting as well. When do I worry about that?
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kit89
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« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2007, 02:36:21 AM »

Once you've created your map, in lightwave export it to GtkRadiant to add lights and to finish it off.
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theskeletonking
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« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2007, 02:51:59 AM »

Thank you, you're so helpful

One modeling question I had is, what are the measurements of the players? As in the xyz measurments in inch, or milimeter form.
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pulchr
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« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2007, 04:28:17 AM »

from the gtkradiant help file

Quote
Game Physics
Player Dimensions
Model size: The player model's actual size is a bounding box 30 units by 30 units square with a height of 56 units. In the game world, eight units roughly equal one foot (30.5 cm). From this, we deduce that the characters are a heroic 7 feet tall (2.13 meters).

i guess the same applies to OA
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theskeletonking
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« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2007, 10:09:06 PM »

THANK YOU!

my map file is coming along nicely. i'm actually running out of questions.


I don't really have any experience with gtkRadiant ( i do have a copy of MacRadiant ) so if any radiant fans wouldn't mind helping out a radiant newbie, I'd be grateful.
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w1zrd
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« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2007, 05:13:01 AM »

THANK YOU!
my map file is coming along nicely. i'm actually running out of questions.
That is always a good sign Smiley
Quote from: theskeletonking
I don't really have any experience with gtkRadiant ( i do have a copy of MacRadiant ) so if any radiant fans wouldn't mind helping out a radiant newbie, I'd be grateful.
There are plenty of experienced mappers around here, the Internet itself is also a great source of information. There are 100's of brilliant how-to-use GTKRadiant, try Google, it's a big world out there Smiley
« Last Edit: December 03, 2007, 08:45:45 AM by w1zrd » Logged

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theskeletonking
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« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2007, 03:05:45 AM »

Here's a link to a post where I show of some screenshots, and pose a question or two.
http://openarena.ws/board/index.php?topic=1354.0
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