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Author Topic: What is your preferred dev machine/environment?  (Read 20557 times)
beast
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« on: August 05, 2007, 07:00:23 pm »

At the risk of never hearing the end of it, I like to find out what the most common dev environment is. I am assuming some form of Gnu/Linux, but would like to hear what most people find the best to use.

I have machines running Windows (multiple versions), Ubuntu, Fedora, and Suse, so I'm not really trying to start an argument over what OS is better, just looking for how to configure the machine that I will use for primary development on OA and ioQuake. At this point I am using a Windows machine with mingw32, but I am leaning towards a Gnu/Linux box, but will wait to see what replies come along...

[Update]
I forgot to mention the machine that I plan to use. It is an AMD Athlon64 3300+, 4GB Ram, Dual 250GB HD, and a Radeon x700. Middle of the road machine, but should suffice.

Also, for Linux, what flavor seems to be the most popular amongst the devs? What dev tools are being used on Linux boxes?

Thanks...
« Last Edit: August 05, 2007, 07:19:42 pm by theBeast » Logged
fromhell
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2007, 07:05:58 pm »

i'd use linux more often if my budget tv card and tablet worked.
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sago007
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2007, 07:14:54 pm »

I spend almost all my time in Linux. I only boot into Windows for games (and thanks to OA it is now very seldom).

If I need Visual Studio or some other non 3d Windows programs I use VmWare.

I also have Windows 98 and 2000 as Virtual Machines to test my programs on those systems. And now I also have a laptop running Vista so I can test on such a system too.
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2007, 07:27:08 pm »

xpsp2 mingw scite
replaced msys console with Console2
gcc is 4.2
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2007, 09:31:38 pm »

I don't suggest using Ubuntu to develop on, it is just not stable enough and you'd basically be screwing people that run stable distros with binary incompatibility.

Slackware or Debian Stable are the defacto "Best" platforms for GNU/Linux development due to their conservative nature, testing of packages, enduring history, and binaries compiled on these two platforms will run on just about any Modern distribution without forcing people to recompile.

I use Debian's Etch AMD64 port which meets my needs*. 
Vim, vi, nano, or kate depending on what needs to be done. 
GCC 4.1.1 (sometimes 3.4.6 or even 3.3.6)
For build systems, Autoconf is a MFPITA, I would suggest cmake or scons, though for oa and ioq3 dev. purposes the build system is already there and completely unnecessary.
mingw32-g**-3.4.5 for cross platform compiling (4.x isn't where it should be)

You couldn't pay me enough to use Visual Studio, even if I had a Windows license.  Borland still has the best IDE and compiler for the MS Windows environment.

*This may change from my default boot environment if Sun releases Open Solaris under the GPL v3. 
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beast
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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2007, 10:34:09 pm »

That's good info about Ubuntu. I might have been tempted to use that if you hadn't said something.

If I go with Debian, is the netinst best or should I download the dvd images? Do you recommend direct from Debian or some other distro based on Debian?

Thanks...
« Last Edit: August 05, 2007, 10:43:59 pm by theBeast » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2007, 11:47:27 pm »

netdist didn't work for my onboard lan Sad
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asking when OA3 will be done won't get OA3 done.
Progress of OA3 currently occurs behind closed doors alone

I do not provide technical support either.

new code development on github
dmn_clown
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« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2007, 12:30:59 am »

If I go with Debian, is the netinst best or should I download the dvd images? Do you recommend direct from Debian or some other distro based on Debian?

I <3 netinstall Cheesy  It gives you complete control over what you install on your system.  Granted you have the same control with the DVD + CD images, you just waste less bandwidth and the media is less expensive. 

Also of Note: if you decide to go the CD or DVD route you really only need to download the first DVD and/or the first CD, you then just edit /etc/apt/sources.list to point towards a Debian mirror near you and install what ever else you want or need.

Obviously, I only suggest Debian Stable for development.

netdist didn't work for my onboard lan Sad

It worked fine here last time I used it, granted that was back in the day when AMD64 was an unofficial port and Sarge was still "Testing" if IIRC I used the Sid netinstall iso and just pointed my sources.list to testing.  The only issue I had was with the gameport of my audigy soundcard being recognized as a firewire ethernet port which is fairly easy to rmmod eth1394 and then insmod <whatever ethernet module> ifconfig eth0 inet up && dhclient eth0 (if you use dhcp) Just remember to blacklist the eth1394 module after install, of course.
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hyp3rfocus
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« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2007, 11:10:08 am »

i haven't used windows for a long time, i'm currently using ubuntu.

dmn_clown-
you've got me thinking about using debian. it was the first linux distro i ever tried and at the time it was a bit beyond me so i went for redhat 8 instead. i've tried various distros over the years and i'm currently using ubuntu. i love the apt package managment, but the unstability is really starting to annoy me. i think it's long overdue that i give debian another shot. debian might have older packages than ubuntu, but since i build pretty much everything i use from subversion repositories that's an irrelevance anyway. what i really need is a stable system to build upon.
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2007, 02:40:43 pm »

Etch + etch-backports will save a lot of trouble there.
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beast
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« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2007, 01:41:35 pm »

I downloaded the Debian etch DVDs (AMD64 variety) and installed it on one of my machines. The machine is:

AMD64
4GB RAM
ATI Radeon X700

Overall, the install went rather painlessly. But, and you know there's always one of those, after the install... Well, it doesn't seem to want to find my video card at all. So, X doesn't start up. (BTW, sad to say that Ubuntu on the same machine, found the video card and worked flawlessly)

I'll Google around to see if I can find anything, so if you know any tricks to try, please let me know...
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2007, 02:18:07 pm »

:# dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg

select vesa as the driver until you can get the fglrx from non-free also file a bug against the d-i using the install report form here.
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beast
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« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2007, 04:45:19 pm »

Thanks.  I'll give it a try when I get home from work. (~1:00am EDT)
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beast
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« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2007, 03:47:09 am »

That didn't work. Still trying. In the mean time, I have a vmware image of Etch installed and running on a different machine. A full Gnome install was done. Since I know nothing about Debian, what do I have to do at this point to make it a development machine for ioquake/openarena?

I noticed there is a Synaptic Package manager, so I am assuming that I will get the required packages via that- I just don't know what packages are required. Thanks for you help...
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ALucas
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« Reply #14 on: August 14, 2007, 04:53:31 am »

Ubuntu works just fine for development (if you want stability, take dapper, if you want the latest applications, take feisty). I think it's better for someone who's not that experienced with linux yet. Ofcourse debian is rock stable, and I use Etch on my server. I still prefer Ubuntu on my laptop though.

I use eclipse for development (with cdt plugin for c++ development ofcourse). The main reason for that is that I also develop in Java and PHP a lot (the first one is included with eclipse, the latter also has a plugin for it).
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2007, 05:47:36 am »

Ubuntu works just fine for development

Not if you want binary compatibility with the majority of GNU/Linux installations.  Compile something on Gassy Baboon, then try to run it on Slackware 12, go ahead, I'll wait but not long because the binary won't run...

That didn't work. Still trying. In the mean time, I have a vmware image of Etch installed and running on a different machine. A full Gnome install was done. Since I know nothing about Debian, what do I have to do at this point to make it a development machine for ioquake/openarena?

Code:
apt-get update && apt-get install build-essential libopenal-dev libvorbis-dev libogg-dev libsdl1.2-dev libasound2-dev libdirectfb-dev

from the console as root this will pull in g++, gcc, libc6-dev, make, and the ioq3 dependencies to compile a fully functional oa engine (I may have missed a dependency, just remember to install the -dev package of whatever gcc whines about not having).  No need for a gui Wink
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ALucas
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« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2007, 06:35:57 am »

Ubuntu works just fine for development

Not if you want binary compatibility with the majority of GNU/Linux installations.  Compile something on Gassy Baboon, then try to run it on Slackware 12, go ahead, I'll wait but not long because the binary won't run...
Haven't thought of that yet. I'm primarily a java developer, and don't have that problem there. The only c++ code I wrote was for personal use, so I didn't really care about other GNU/Linux installations.

Will keep in mind that if I ever want to compile something for other people's use, I'll do it on my debian machine Smiley
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beast
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« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2007, 01:17:00 pm »

Code:
apt-get update && apt-get install build-essential libopenal-dev libvorbis-dev libogg-dev libsdl1.2-dev libasound2-dev libdirectfb-dev

from the console as root this will pull in g++, gcc, libc6-dev, make, and the ioq3 dependencies to compile a fully functional oa engine (I may have missed a dependency, just remember to install the -dev package of whatever gcc whines about not having).  No need for a gui Wink

That seems to have done it. After installing all of the packages, I was able to compile OA. Woohoo! Now... Where are those bugs? ... :-)
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beast
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« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2007, 02:36:41 pm »

Ok. Next step... Does anyone cross compile the windows client on linux? If so, just wondering what other packages I need to install to get it to work... mingw32? directx-devel.tar.gz ? anything else? Or... just don't do it ?

Thanks...
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2007, 07:30:04 pm »

You need the directx package from sdl but you also need ogg and vorbis headers / libs (and the libs have to be compiled with whatever gcc you choose).
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next_ghost
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« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2007, 04:57:13 pm »

Gentoo Linux, GVim+BASH+GCC+Make and some cross tools for Windoze cross compiling.
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beast
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« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2007, 01:11:33 pm »

...and some cross tools for Windoze cross compiling.

Ok.... So.... What might 'some cross tools for Windoze' be? :-)
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next_ghost
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« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2007, 02:52:21 pm »

Ok.... So.... What might 'some cross tools for Windoze' be? :-)

This
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dmn_clown
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« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2007, 04:01:34 pm »

*sigh*

http://www.mingw.org/MinGWiki/index.php/BuildMingwCross

Read and understand the script before running it.
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beast
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« Reply #24 on: August 22, 2007, 03:35:54 pm »

As I mentioned a few posts back,
just wondering what other packages I need to install to get it to work... mingw32? directx-devel.tar.gz ? anything else? Or... just don't do it ?

Mingw32, and directx-devel.tar.gz are items that I installed. I was merely asking if there was anything else that I needed to have in order to get the cross compile to work. Since next_ghost didn't mention what tools were being used, I thought I would ask just to see if there was something different there.

Sorry if this came across as not understanding what was going on. I'll try what I've got installed and form a better question if/when it doesn't work. Thanks...
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